Comic Book Reviews for This Week: 1/11/2023 – ComicBook.com

By Chase Magnett
Welcome to this week in comic book reviews! The staff have come together to read and review nearly everything that released today. It isn’t totally comprehensive, but it includes just about everything from DC and Marvel with the important books from the likes of Image, Boom, IDW, Scout, AfterShock, and more.
The review blurbs you’ll find contained herein are typically supplemented in part by longform individual reviews for significant issues. This week that includes Lazarus Planet: Alpha #1, Miles Morales: Spider-Man #2, and Black Cloak #1.
Also, in case you were curious, our ratings are simple: we give a whole or half number out of five; that’s it! If you’d like to check out our previous reviews, they are all available here.
Batman and The Joker: The Deadly Duo #3 separates the two titular characters for the majority of the issue, functionally shifting gears for the bulk of things to make this more of a straightforward Batman detective tale, albeit one set within the framework of the larger story that Silvestri has framed out with the previous two issues. And while those two issues—particularly the second—were a little on the shaky side, this issue is very well done and really gives readers a reason to not only invest themselves in things beyond Silvestri’s fantastic art, but also make it a lot more reasonable as to why Batman would even work with Joker in the first place. Putting Batman face-to-face with something beyond his understanding and pushing him into a corner where partnering with the unthinkable becomes the only answer feels very much in line with the darkness of Gotham that is classic DC but still feels original to what Silvestri is creating here. We also start to see the story framed more around Batman in a way that drives the story more organically and that twist definitely works both in terms of interest and pacing. Overall, this issue is a big improvement over the second issue and definitely feels much more interesting. — Nicole Drum
Rating: 4 out of 5
This run of Batman Incorporated was already enthusiastic in its narrative and aesthetic convictions, but this issue is where the entire ordeal really begins to click together. While there is still some meat on the bone with regards to the arcs of some of the other international Batmen, the narrative that Ed Brisson puts together is lively and rewarding, without having too massive of stakes for the larger DCU. Combined with John Timms’ scrappy and gorgeous art, Batman Incorporated is continuing to grow on me with each passing issue. — Jenna Anderson
Rating: 4 out of 5
It’s always disappointing to say goodbye to a wonderful series, but if Batman: Urban Legends had to end, this is one lovely note to go out on. Batman: Urban Legends #23 brings the anthology series and three of its multi-part stories to a thrilling close, and to top it off the one self-contained story knocks it out of the park too. Jamal Campbell, Adriano Lucas, and Lucas Gattoni make a case for a second Nightwing ongoing with “The Director” part two, a stellar conclusion that carries a style and vibe perfectly complimentary of Tom Taylor’s series but feels fun and distinct on its own. Meanwhile, “Arkham Academy” part three by Dennis Culver, Hayden Sherman, Jordie Bellaire, and Pat Brosseau ends on a high note and sets up what could end up being an entertaining series if DC ever wants to pursue it. Then there’s “Hot Pursuit” by Kenny Porter, Simone Di Meo, and Deron Bennett, which was simply outstanding across the board, delivering a gorgeous Robin story that felt fresh and captured the dynamic between the Dynamic Duo in a truly superb way. The issue closes out with another stellar story of family in part four of “The Murder Club,” and if there was a perfect way to end this series, this was absolutely it. Joey Esposito, Vasco Georgiev, Alex Guimaraes, and Carlos M. Mangual weave in so many defining elements of the character while also providing a refreshing vulnerability that just isn’t possible without this particular premise. Despite the larger-than-life circumstances, the hopes parents have for their children and the struggle to live up to those and all the conflicts and misunderstandings in between ring true, and you’d have to not feel anything to not come away from those final pages unaffected. It’s sad to say goodbye, but Batman: Urban Legends saved one of its best for last, and I couldn’t recommend it more. — Matthew Aguilar
Rating: 5 out of 5
Perhaps the single most impressive element in Danger Street remains how dexterously it balances a set of 13 protagonists, with each character or small ensemble playing into the second issue in a manner that continues their own plots while weaving them more clearly into others. It’s a striking feat of scripting. While it will doubtless take many more issues for the big picture to become clear, there’s clearly a plan and sufficient momentum to not doubt it present here. Funerals and follow ups fill most of the issue with various investigations revealing new connections and inspiring conspiracies in reader’s minds. There is a delightful tinge to the black humor surrounding the amoral child billionaires of the Green Team and Fornés reminds readers he’s every bit as capable of depicting Kirby tech and grand odysseys as gritty crime tales, although both sing on the page. The only weakness in these many overlapping plots is that the plotting leaves little space for character; Lady Cop and all the rest are exactly who readers imagined them to be from the start, but that at least keeps things slightly more simple. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 4 out of 5
G’Nort gets the Human Target treatment, but he’s surprisingly not the biggest chump of this issue. Christopher Chance starts to dig into Guy Gardner’s alleged death with the help of everyone’s favorite Green Lantern G’Nort. It’s a bit of a convenient issue, but it does set up a twist that was pretty obvious a few issues ago and gets us that much closer to Chance’s actual killer. While this issue fell into the pratfalls that have weakened the series as a whole, it sets up a very interesting pair of final issues. — Christian Hoffer
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
I Am Batman continues to fracture Jace’s relationship with the rest of the Fox family, as readers discover that he’s the result of an affair between Lucius and a subordinate. Jace doesn’t take the news well, especially as his birth mother is being used in a war against the Fox family. To be honest, this wasn’t the strongest issue – the drama feels overwrought and while Jace’s extreme reaction is understandable, it feels in conflict with some of the growth he’s shown during the series. — Christian Hoffer
Rating: 3 out of 5
The bottom line for Lazarus Planet: Alpha is that this is what it looks like when what might be an interesting idea isn’t given the proper space to develop. Instead of something with strong connections to narratives that readers already know, understand, and have some investment in, they get a batch of wild ideas, a hope it is heading somewhere, a mildly-interesting premise, and great art — and the artwork is really what’s worth writing home about. — Nicole Drum
Rating: 2 out of 5
The first two issues of WildC.A.T.s felt like it was firing on all cylinders, and while the third installment feels like the weakest of the bunch, there’s still plenty of fun to be found. The biggest weakness of the issue is the sheer amount of characters that are taking up the page count, with so many Wildstorm heroes and villains being brought back that you can get lost, especially when it comes to trying to keep up with “who knows who” or “who is different in this new iteration”. Grifter remains the heart of the series and is the best part here once again, though I feel like the book should choose between whether it wants to be more his book or the CATS themselves. — Evan Valentine
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
I genuinely wish that I knew what the magic combination was for a good Wonder Woman comic. While Wonder Woman #795 is an improvement over the previous issue—largely in that it’s well-paced and full of action—it also falls into what too many Wonder Woman stories do and that’s treat Diana as a sidekick or supporting character in her own story. While I love seeing Yara Flor show up to team up with Diana, as well as seeing Siggy and Steve do some butt kicking as well (even if the power imbalance here as they go up against Hyperion is… something) there’s just something off putting about Diana being sidelined over and over for other characters. Art wise, Amancay Nahuelpan does a great job with this, however and Michael W. Conrad and Becky Cloonan do pull out a solid cliffhanger, but still, this whole title—and this issue—would be better served with a little focus. — Nicole Drum
Rating: 3 out of 5
Parker, Jameson, and Robertson are trapped in an absurd simulacrum of New York City deep within the bowels of Limbo, and it makes for a simultaneously hilarious and unsettling issue of Amazing Spider-Man. Everything from the offices of the Daily Bugle to human accessories like a toothbrush have been replicated by demons with such basic misunderstandings that it all seems humorous until characters are reminded that everything surrounding them is likely to leave them dead. It’s a twisty tone that’s beautifully struck from page one and allows readers to catch themselves up on the basic mechanics of this particular scenario. Every step along the way shows readers the dynamic rather than having Ben Reilly tell them, and it makes for a delightful bit of exploration in a genuinely unique setting. Each new demon and inverted version of a familiar form is a nightmarish wonder as depicted by Ed McGuinness who leans heavily into the concept and makes the familiar intriguing and grotesque in equal measure. While Spidey is stuck in a literal hell of his own making, readers are bound to have a blast watching him crawl back out. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 4 out of 5
Writer Paul Levitz and artist Alan Davis succeed in channeling classic Marvel books with both storytelling style and character designs; but manage to improve on the experience of reading older books by maintaining the modern comic convention of not filling each panel with as many words as possible. For that, it’s a good read, but the only drawback is that it also reads a lot like a story you’ve already seen. This old-fashioned story with modern conventions works in this case, but it’s not reinventing the wheel. The series may not be aiming for that either though, it might just be aiming for fun, which it is. — Spencer Perry
Rating: 4 out of 5
T’Challa is driven to fix the massive problems he caused, but the Avengers just won’t let him be great. Seeing Gentle and Tosin side-by-side with their glowing Wakandan tattoos makes me want to see them together in a team-up book someday. A very brief Black Panther vs. Captain America fight is interrupted by the most unlikely suspect to ever come to Black Panther’s aid. Now I want to hear how this treaty between the two countries came to be. — Tim Adams
Rating: 3 out of 5
R.B. Silva is back on art duties, and he’s not alone. Arnim Zola’s Dimension Z henchmen have returned, which should be a bigger issue for the also-returned Nomad. We get to see Captain America and Nomad spend more time saving civilians than fighting supervillains, which is a welcome change of pace. The reappearance of Falcon on the final page sets up an uncomfortable confrontation next issue that should have some major repercussions for Sam Wilson. — Tim Adams
Rating: 3 out of 5
Following a detour in issue #8, the latest installment of Carnage picks up in a more logical spot that’s after the events of issue #7. Carnage itself is still in the process of trying to essentially become an unstoppable force through the newfound power of Norse tech and abilities. Outside of this broad aim, though, Carnage #9 doesn’t do much else to push the story forward other than reveal the titular character’s next big goal. At this point, I’m more curious to see what Carnage intends to do with its more grand plan, but I’m still enjoying the journey along the way. — Logan Moore
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
The promise of Matthew’s vision for the island is realized complete with the flaws inherent in any system throughout Daredevil #7 in an issue that speaks to the entire run’s radical reimagining of its hero’s mission. That comes complete with Daredevil leading supervillains to attack police and landlords in a deeply cathartic sequence for lefties that’s bound to leave everyone cheering for one of Marvel’s most mocked supervillains. Both in action and conversation, the issue delivers striking poses and panel compositions with excellent silhouettes and wonderfully composed scenes of suspense. The overall emotional effect of seeing so much potential being achieved frames the inevitable reversal wonderfully in a showdown that earns its seemingly hyperbolic degree of presentation with two armies of good and evil preparing to enter the field. Daredevil delivers a riveting morality play of modern social movements set against an epic fantasy backdrop with some of Marvel Comics’ greatest characters; it’s a truly astounding superhero comic. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 5 out of 5
The second half of Dark Web: Ms Marvel reads a bit like 10 pounds of comics stuffed into a 5 pound bag; the issue is loaded with clever ideas, but lacks the space to give them their proper due. For example, a Limbo-animated mosque creates a surprising space for discussion of identity and local community, but most of that conflict occurs and is resolved off panel leaving superheroes to summarize an event lacking all but the superficial image of a demonic mosque, which again is handled with shocking grace considering how it might otherwise be read. The ultimate solution to Ms. Marvel’s central conflict, which revitalizes an old idea for future use, comes seemingly out of nowhere and is executed in the smallest of panels. There’s plenty of cleverness, but without space to breathe it’s never as fun or exciting as it otherwise would be. Combine that with any number of lines and a final page that read like an afterschool special and a sincere tone begins to feel like pandering. This miniseries reminds readers of the ongoing potential of Ms. Marvel as a leading heroine, but fails to make the concept sing as it so often has. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 2.5 out of 5
Though this finale is rushed, Ghost Rider #10 adequately puts a cap on everything Percy and Smith have told to date. Every loose end comes together and it comes together quickly without so much as a second to breathe, all leading to one of the biggest Ghost Rider reveals in recent memory. As with previous entries in the series, this comic is just as moody and dark as the rest and this creative team is at the top of their game throughout. If one thing’s for certain, it’s that they’re just getting started. — Adam Barnhardt
Rating: 4 out of 5
Legion of X has a knack for ratcheting up the stakes and as chaos unfolds across multiple fronts, Legion of X #9 provides readers a terrifying into-the-fire scenario as everything goes wrong. What’s most impressive is how naturally the revelations unfold as this seemingly secondary series weaves its way into some of Krakoa’s most crucial threads, both plot and thematic. It’s only the issue’s relentless pacing with each page turn delivering new revelations that maintains the heavy degree of exposition; Spurrier makes great use of text pages by making them secondary to the story. With so many fascinating settings and such a diverse cast of mutants, the density of the story makes for consistently impressive panels that carefully track the shift of action as various Legion members face increasingly terrifying threats. Legion of X #9 builds to a frightening crescendo in an issue that promises a potent year of X-Men comics ahead for 2023. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 4.5 out of 5
Mary Jane & Black Cat is a “Dark Web” miniseries that will extend several months past the event, but Mary Jane & Black Cat #2 shows why it merits a spot on any MJ or Black Cat fan’s pull list. Having descended into Limbo, the unlikely partners are posed with a chance to escape that, of course, takes the form of a heist. The framing for this supernatural robbery is presented in gorey detail that provides plenty of eye-catching previews of the setting and antagonists to come. No space is wasted and the pair are on their way and engaging traps bound to inspire Dungeon Masters everywhere before the issue’s end. Between the splashy setting and wide array of conflicts (i.e. secrets between friends and who will rule hell), Mary Jane & Black Cat is a bona fide highlight of “Dark Web.” — Chase Magnett
Rating: 4 out of 5
I know it can’t happen because of scheduling and the monthly grind on artists, but I wish the Miles Morales: Spider-Man creative team could have a long run together. They’ve already made the series a “can’t miss” title for each month, and Ziglar appears to have a good handle on Miles’ personality. If you’ve ever wanted to check out a Miles Morales comic, now is the time. — Tim Adams
Rating: 5 out of 5
Eve L. Ewing’s new Monica Rambeau series continues to be a unique exploration of the hero and her place in the Marvel Universe. Artists Ivan Fiorelli & Luca Maresca are given a large scope to work their magic with a wide variety of locales and a unique set of character designs. To that end they also do a remarkable thing that is, frankly, brave in the modern comic landscape, maintaining a distinct visual style for their work in a setting with no environment and just characters conversing. Come for the fresh perspective on a character’s position in a vast comic book landscape, stay for the series’ grand visuals. — Spencer Perry
Rating: 2 out of 5
Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur jumps forward with issue two this week, and it brings our heroine face to face with the dangers of social media. After a friend reveals their secret Kree identity, all bets are off as the city around Lunella falls to pieces. And when her dinosaur falls prey to the hysteria, things manage to go from bad to worse. — Megan Peters
Rating: 3 out of 5
Jed MacKay’s ability to hone in on small aspects of Moon Knight’s mythology that haven’t really been explored yet is second to none, and that once again fuels the series in Moon Knight #19. The exchanges between Marc and Hunter’s Moon are always entertaining but beyond that, they also hold compelling threads and ideas that the series can pick up and run with, such as death, rebirth, limits of power, and overall ideals. Artist Federico Sabbatini, colorist Rachelle Rosenberg, and letterer Cory Petit allow these exchanges to leap off the page while also continually catching your eye with gorgeous and moody environments and bone-breaking action set pieces. When the book strays away from this dynamic it loses a bit of steam, as while MacKay has created a worthy villain in Zodiac, his monologues don’t add much to his character and they aren’t nearly as interesting as what is happening between Khonsu’s two fists. Despite that, Moon Knight‘s world continues to be one of Marvel’s most intriguing playgrounds, and that doesn’t seem to be stopping anytime soon. — Matthew Aguilar
Rating: 4 out of 5
Predator #6 plays out exactly how you might anticipate as the collective crew of humans prepare for the Predator laying siege to their ship; the issue doesn’t find its fun in surprising readers as much as delivering just what they signed up for in fine style. Kev Walker’s action sequences have been notable across the series, but they reach new heights with dripping close up kills, brutal back-and-forths, and stunning silhouettes in this issue. Fans return to Predator in all of its forms because the franchise provides an exceptional vehicle for impressive combat sequences, and that’s exactly what Predator #6 is about. There’s familiarity dripping from every line spoken at the end, but it’s difficult to not want more of what you just saw – so I suppose I’ll be back for Predator #1 in a few months. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 4 out of 5
With Savage Avengers #9 I feel like, as a reader, I’ve reached the point where I wish I had this story as one continuous volume—be that a graphic novel or a trade—than an issue-by-issue series because the amount of going back to previous issues to pick up the thread and continue makes reading a massive chore. And that doesn’t serve the story. This issue is just stuffed to bursting with action, so much so that it would be impossible to get bored for a single moment and realistically, that’s a good thing. The pacing of this issue is just insane in that it works even with all of the action. It’s unrelenting, but in a good way. The flip of that is that there is so much going on to the point that it feels like too much to properly track — especially as we get to that final panel which feels like a huge, huge moment even if you haven’t fully digested it. This book is very much larger than life and sometimes it suffers for that, but it’s still a solid read if you can invest the energy to follow all the threads. — Nicole Drum
Rating: 3 out of 5
The double-crosses and switched identities persist with Vader and many of Padmé’s former handmaids, to the point that even trying to break down the plot here would be a pointless task, given how many fakeouts each character is witness to. That said, the various twists and turns of the narrative fully work as it keeps us so engaged that we even forget when this story is taking place and leads us to wonder if Vader could actually be in trouble, despite this story taking place before Star Wars: Return of the Jedi. If nothing else, we’re hoping to get some fulfilling reveals for Padmé’s handmaids and Ochi of Bestoon that shed light on their statuses during the culmination of the original trilogy, while also learning just how strong the pull to the Dark Side really is and whether Sabé and her allies can be pulled down an evil path. — Patrick Cavanaugh
Rating: 4 out of 5
In the wake of the explosion at the Temple of Kyber, the Convocation is tasked with figuring out the best way to bring a culprit to justice, though their meeting sees an unexpected visitor that calls their whole existence into question. Given the overly complex narrative timeline and spatial awareness of the previous issue, this installment marked for a much more cohesive experience that helped get the series back on track. Part of what makes this point in time so interesting for the galaxy far, far away is that the lines between good and evil, Jedi and Sith, are relatively nonexistent, so you see various factions with various agendas all grasping for power. This chapter specifically highlights the all-too-common political tactics we see exploited in the modern world and how those can be far more dangerous than brute force, leaving us much more excited for what’s around the corner in this series than we were at the end of the last issue. — Patrick Cavanaugh
Rating: 3 out of 5
The Mandalorian finds an opportunity to cut his ties with a former Imperial bounty and protect The Child once and for all, though he has to enlist some unlikely allies in hopes of pulling off the mission. The book continues to authentically bring the core beats of Season 1 of The Mandalorian to life, despite not adding much from a narrative perspective, but the diversity of events that unfold in this chapter higlight the talents of the artistic team. From forest planets to deserts to ship interiors to flashbacks to campfires, the book and its art allows the story to be explored in perspectives that don’t feel quite as impressive in live-action, giving each sequence within the chapter its own atmosphere and vibe. The praise still largely goes to the source material, yet seeing these recognizable exchanges unfold with artistic liberties does make the experience feel fresh in unexpected ways. — Patrick Cavanaugh
Rating: 4 out of 5
Tiger Division #3 takes our series in a wild direction as we finally learn the dark history behind Tae-won’s power. His life as a gangster falls to pieces this week in a tragic flashback, and things only get worse for the hero when a face from the past tries to take his superpowers. But with an ally waiting in the wings, all may not be lost for Taegukgi just yet! — Megan Peters
Rating: 4 out of 5
Logan manages to finally restore his mind, but as has been the case with the rest of this arc, it was through more stomach-churning body horror. The big reveal about what has happened to this particular area of Krakoa is fascinating. And while I can’t say that I’ve been keeping with the entire X-Men run lately, this feels like it could be a potential endgame for the entire Krakoa saga if Marvel ever decides to pull the trigger on that idea. — Connor Casey
Rating: 4 out of 5
X-Men #18 follows up on the previous arc’s surprising reveal that the Laura Kinney that went into the Vault did not die, as her infiltration believed. That means that are now two Laura Kinneys in the world, the one resurrected at the same age she was before entering the Vault and one who has lived hundreds of years within it. Gerry Duggan deals with the first meeting between the two lightly, couching it in a meet-up with the X-Terminators while dealing with a vampire nest. Gerry Duggan’s signature banter and humor are on display, and C.F. Villa and Matt Milla provide visuals in the style of, if not on the same level, as the X-line defining team of Pepe Larraz and Marte Gracia. There’s also an aside of the X-Men “doing X-Men stuff” and Jean Grey calling out Beast on his nonsense. Seeing Beast taken to task is always fun, but it also highlights the philosophical divide between the X-Men and X-Force, that the X-Men still believe in fighting to protect even those who fear and hate them. You can’t help but get the sense that either the X-Men’s optimism or Beast’s paranoia will be a major factor in the coming “Fall of X.” — Jamie Lovett
Rating: 4 out of 5
All Against All explains the history of the last human survivor (hilariously named Helpless) and how he managed to thrive in the controlled habitat created by aliens. This is a reverse Predator situation, although one seemingly derived by fundamentally misunderstanding human intelligence. The comic feels very raw and primal despite its sci-fi theme, helped along by the unique art of Caspar Wijngaard. It makes for an interesting contrast, one that hasn’t fully succeeded through two issues but still has plenty of promise. –– Christian Hoffer
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
The world of Assassin’s Apprentice feels has a weight and aura to it that makes hooks you in despite its at times unwelcoming grit. That does seem to further endear you to Fitz and his journey of survival through it, and that extends in a smaller way towards Fitz’s caretaker, though actions carried out here will call that into question. It’s a testament to the work of writers Robin Hobb and Jody Houser, as well as artist Ryan Kelly, colorist Jordie Bellaire, and letterer Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou that the world feels so well developed. While it’s hard to watch Fitz struggle, especially with how things play out towards the end, you can’t help but root for him and continue to be drawn into the history he now finds himself a part of. Those last few pages are rough, and there are times I don’t always love how rough this world can be, but at this point, I’m all in on seeing how this plays out, and Assassin’s Apprentice has quickly become a series I look forward to each month. — Matthew Aguilar
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
There’s an excellent example in the opening pages to how social media echo chambers work, both positively and negatively. What’s both hilarious and sad is how a journalist is put on trial but a community that has been hurt and discarded by society. Even she calls out how everything is absurd. And we can’t overlook the backdrop of Jack and the Bean Stalk. — Tim Adams
Rating: 3 out of 5
It’s easy for readers to invest in Black Cloak‘s world and characters. The debut issue offers enjoyable artwork, lively dialogue, layers of intrigue, and possibly something more to say. Black Cloak #1 ticks the right boxes for sci-fi storytelling, hooking readers in to see its mystery unfold. — Jamie Lovett
Rating: 4 out of 5
Blood Stained Teeth stood out in its first few issues for being an entirely fresh entry to vampiric tales. Now eight issues in, the series is running dangerously close to tiring itself out, featuring similar scenes and arcs become redundant from issue to issue as this tale starts to run in a circle. While Reynolds and Moore’s neon-soaked artworks continues to be a delight, the story is starting to grow tired as it fails to make any serious progress forward. –– Adam Barnhardt
Rating: 3 out of 5
Ten Thousand Black Feathers arrives at a conclusion, whatever that may be, in this issue. It’s a final destination composed primarily of vibes as the story follows Trish into the fantasy world she and Jack created and spends most its pages there, outside of a pair of brief sequences. The design of that hellish landscape is instantly striking and each new fold revealed by Sorrentino, whether it’s hellish squid monsters or ancient sacrificial altars, makes an impression. All of the outstanding aesthetics provide little context to the characters and mystery introduced at the start of this series, however. Although Trish’s quest arrives at a conclusion, grasping what that ending entails is left wide open to interpretation with a few nudges offered about conspiracies left unexplored. It’s a surprising ending, only in that it seems to forget much of what was established earlier in favor of a fantastical escape from reality. No matter how impressive it may appear, readers will most likely be left desiring more. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 2.5 out of 5
Now that readers Scott Snyder and Jock have fully immersed readers in The Book of Evil‘s world, they can launch into Homer and his friends’ attempts to escape it. It reads similarly to a YA dystopia, with the young, oppressed heroes enacting their daring plan. The issue’s ending reads like the intent is to shock and surprise, but it’s predictable, and that’s fine as it fits the book’s themes. The Book of Evil is about a world devoid of empathy, and plenty of people know how it feels to have someone they love suddenly view them as less than human. The series continues to present as Homer’s journal, a construct from the world in which the story is et. The craftsmanship put into it remains astounding, though with this issue being more of a straight, plot-focused affair, there’s less opportunity for Jock and book designer Emma Price to flourish. What illustration is here is up to Jock’s usual quality, but readers should know that they’re getting something that walks the line between a comic book and a chapter of a sparsely illustrated prose story. — Jamie Lovett
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
I’ve really loved Crashing since the first issue came out, blending the fast-paced world of medicine with that of super heroics. Luckily, the final issue is able to stick the landing for the series, giving us not just worthy conclusions to our characters, but imparting some interesting themes to boot. Rose remains an intriguing protagonist, wrapped up in far too much controversy thanks to her drug addiction and workaholic tendencies. The real sticking point from Klein and Beem’s final issue isn’t just Rose coming to grips with her life but also coming to the realization that there sometimes can’t be redemption when it comes to mistakes one makes in the past from others. Crashing is a fantastic comic book and I hope we have the opportunity to revisit this world down the line. — Evan Valentine
Rating: 4.5 out of 5
Dark Ride has consistently entertained and terrified across its existing three issues, but this week’s installment makes things even more horrifying and compelling. Just as one mystery surrounding the park appears to be resolved, another macabre domino effect begins to fall into place, culminating in a genuinely surprising ending. Everyone involved with this book is clearly having a lot of fun, and just enough of that energy proves to be infectious, turning what could easily be some off-putting twists and turns into a genuinely good read. — Jenna Anderson

Rating: 4 out of 5
The Dead Lucky #5 ultimately reads like a first draft, with any number of minor flaws to be found in its paneling, transitions, and clunky plotting elements. Just as the many series actors prepare for a battle another one arrives; in the lead-up there are callbacks to relationships and attachments that add nothing new, and what follows is an underwhelming climax, at best. The highlight of this action are three new mech designs that embrace non-humanoid elements, but when they are finally put to work, it’s difficult to define exactly how they move or interact between panels. That lack of clarity extends to human characters as well with key figures seemingly teleporting large distances in the seconds implied between panels. Minor inconsistencies and a lack of detail add up to make the chaotic action difficult to track across multiple pages. The most important revelations and twists emerge as expository dialogue detached from the action itself in what was likely intended to be a climactic encounter that reads instead as an indictment of the series’ most substantial storytelling flaws. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 2 out of 5
Will Morris does an incredible job with stories within stories, but what really makes Gospel #3 perhaps the best and most fun issue of the series yet is that this issue not only deepens the story—past, present, and legend—but inserts a banger of a bar fight as well. That’s right, we get story, we get intrigue, we get personal development for all of our characters, the introduction of a threat, and a really fun bar fight all while pulling back the layers of the larger themes this series has been approaching from issue one. Is there probably a deeper way to approach this issue? Yes. But from my perspective, this is just such a beautifully crafted and fun issue that doesn’t lose sight of what it’s trying to accomplish with the greater story and it’s fantastic. — Nicole Drum
Rating: 5 out of 5
What happens when no one can die? That’s the question Grim #7 poses to its readers. Placing the opening moments in a hospital full of critical patients that can’t die – no matter how hard they beg for it – is a gripping scene to watch unfold. The different angles the art presents and the chaotic nature of the word balloons help drive home just how intense a situation this is. If Jessica hopes to set the world right, she’s going to have to save Death itself. — Tim Adams
Rating: 5 out of 5
Scribe Sarah Gailey continues to deliver on the hard-sci-fi promise of Know Your Station‘s set-up, digging deeper into its noir tone and making its mystery even more compelling. Artist Liana Kangas is at their best when focusing on the lead character’s place in the larger story, with some over-crowded panels not as pleasant to look at as others. Special shout out to letterer Cardinal Rae, who channels the depictions of drug withdrawals and AI sentience that the art is bringing us with the lettering in a deep and meaningful way. — Spencer Perry
Rating: 4 out of 5
The Least We Can Do is moving toward a very intense finale, with Uriel and the Eclipse looking to gather info on their biggest score yet. While doing so, we find a bit more about Uriel’s past and set up what’s almost definitely an unhappy family reunion in the finale. Honestly, this series is really struggling with its pacing. Hopefully it has a satisfying conclusion that provides an actual ending instead of an abrupt stop like past issues. — Christian Hoffer
Rating: 2 out of 5
After seeing more than one of the kids’ origin stories inserted into the same issue, I realize I would’ve liked to have seen them spread out more throughout the earlier parts of the series. Moments prior were impactful enough already, but flashbacks showing things like the twins hitching rides on trains together felt less impactful after key story moments. They’re welcome regardless, however, and even thought the human versions of the kids look basically identical to their vampire forms by design, the context is effective at framing them as essentially brand new characters compared to what we’ve seen over the past several issues. — Tanner Dedmon
Rating: 4 out of 5
Maskerade continues to be a tough read, bouncing back and forth between incredibly crude dialogue and stomach-turning imagery. If its main character weren’t so abrasive—or if it completely shifted the perspective to her assistant, who seems to be the only normal person in an otherwise insane city—it could find the right balance. But no such luck for Maskerade #4. — Connor Casey
Rating: 2 out of 5
Mindset comes to a roaring conclusion in its sixth issue, wrapping up its story as tightly as it can. Throughout its run, Mindset has shined a spotlight on the dangers of social media though it always stops short in finding a solution to its madness. Though the story is satisfactory, it ends up being dense just to be dense at times. It’s more evident than ever that Pearson’s stunning artwork carried it through to the end. — Adam Barnhardt
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
A big part of The Ones appeal is the snappy/witty dialogue that emanates from Brian Michael Bendis’ writing, which is here in spades. There are some interesting concepts at work here and Bendis, to his credit, is able to take the traditional idea of fighting against the big bad devil known as Satan, and flip it on its ear. Edgar’s art works well for the character moments though it is a tad lacking when it comes to the sheer lack of environments throughout many of the panels here. I think if you’re a big fan of Brian Michael Bendis’ work, this will be right up your alley, but it suffers from the weaknesses inherent in that as well. Still, there’s fun to be had here with an interesting concept to help move things along, however slowly. — Evan Valentine
Rating: 3 out of 5
While the plot might be both a little too simple and a little too convoluted for casual readers, Red Sonja/Hell Sonja is still showing a lot of compelling promise. This week’s issue takes the unlikely team-up between the two Sonjas into a weirder and even more personal territory, while still begging a lot of questions for what’s to come. Miriana Puglia’s art and Ellie Wright’s colors are easily the highlight here, especially as the book’s roster only continues to grow in weird directions. We’ll just have to wait and see if the journey of Red Sonja/Hell Sonja proves to be worthwhile. — Jenna Anderson

Rating: 3.5 out of 5
Something Is Killing The Children is a master of maximizing dialogue, and issue #28 is a prime example. James Tynion IV is so adept at creating impactful moments within a small footprint, and if you needed a reminder, look no further than a car ride with Erica and Gabi. Their exchange isn’t long and it isn’t heavy in exposition, but it sticks with you the entire issue, and there are several equally compelling moments throughout. Every aspect of the issue comes together brilliantly to make these moments sing. Artist Werther Dell’Edera’s artwork is just as riveting when it moves out of the shadows and into the light, and colorist Miquel Muerto’s work on Erica is constantly stellar, especially when things hit the fan. There wasn’t a dull moment to be found, and what’s amazing is this battle is only getting started. Something Is Killing The Children has never been better. — Matthew Aguilar
Rating: 5 out of 5
Specs #3 unearths the dark secret behind our mystery glasses, and to no one’s surprise, the shades are as cursed as you’d expect. With a town up in arms over a murder, this latest issue brings everything to light from racial injustice to teenage love. But in the end, the question remains stands whether or not you can simply burn the past away. — Megan Peters
Rating: 4 out of 5
Spy Superb introduces readers to a charming comedic premise with plenty of potential for genuine intrigue. The opening sequence provides a rundown of the origins of “Spy Superb” and the operation originating from the legend of a single masterful spy. What’s most surprising is the blunt humor applied alongside hyper-serious talking heads, which never fails to deliver an intended laugh. After establishing the premise, there’s a new disaster and agent at hand, which results in a long issue that primarily acts as an explainer. This pacing is the most notable flaw in an otherwise delightful new pitch that promises a great deal of fun and cleverness in the months ahead. It bleeds into an action sequence that blurs the line between slapstick and grim violence splendidly, but also stretches itself far beyond reason. The absurdity of Kindt’s concepts have always been part of their appeal and there’s plenty to appreciate in Spy Superb #1, but it seems the best tricks likely wait ahead now that the concept has been refined into an actual story. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
With the first issue of this series introducing us to Sav Malagan, this second installment merely continues the journey, delivering a blend of comedic antics and action-filled battles, all of which entertain the reader. This chapter does deliver family-friendly excitement, though its embrace of the more thrilling components of the galaxy far, far away that results in it skimping on the story, so given how little we know about most of these characters, there wouldn’t have been much gained by reading the previous issue. There’s nothing inherently wrong with a book being fun and silly and featuring intergalactic combat, so much as it feels a bit underwhelming that we didn’t get much by way of narrative momentum. Hopefully this becomes the exception to the rule and the next chapter can help bring back the appeal of the premise introduced in the debut issue. — Patrick Cavanaugh
Rating: 3 out of 5
Whenever Time Before Time enters a new arc, I get a little bit nervous that this could finally be the first instance when the shoe finally drops in this series. After a stellar first 18 issues, I’ve started to wonder just how many great ideas Rory McConville and Declan Shalvey have left to keep Time Before Time feeling fresh. Thankfully, in the midst biggest transition in the history of the series, it still seems like Time Before Time has a lot left in the tank. Issue #19 primarily sets the stage by introducing the new locale and characters that will be appearing in the series quite often moving forward. And while there aren’t many takeaways otherwise, I continue to remain optimistic and excited about what is being set up for the future. — Logan Moore
Rating: 4 out of 5
Two Graves #3 hits a hurdle this week as readers learn more about our leads and their past. Though gorgeous, the chapter’s slow pace is a hard read given its lengthy exposition. And when you factor in how vague our leads are being, well – Two Graves digs a troublesome hole for itself with this latest issue. — Megan Peters
Rating: 2 out of 5
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