Comic Book Reviews for This Week: 11/30/2022 – ComicBook.com

By Chase Magnett
Welcome to this week in comic book reviews! The staff have come together to read and review nearly everything that released today. It isn’t totally comprehensive, but it includes just about everything from DC and Marvel with the important books from the likes of Image, Boom, IDW, Scout, AfterShock, and more.
The review blurbs you’ll find contained herein are typically supplemented in part by longform individual reviews for significant issues. This week that includes Blue Beetle: Graduation Day #1, Planet Hulk: Worldbreaker #1, and Killadelphia #25.
Also, in case you were curious, our ratings are simple: we give a whole or half number out of five; that’s it! If you’d like to check out our previous reviews, they are all available here.
The new Batgirls Annual sets up the next arc of the series, with a series of interesting premises. While we knew that Steph’s dad was looming in the background, Lady Shiva makes a surprise appearance in this issue as well. Further complicating the Batgirls’ relationship is that Babs has left the loft and Cass and Steph encounter another unexpected complication that we won’t spoil here. All in all, a fun issue that nicely sets up a second year of the series. — Christian Hoffer
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
Blue Beetle: Graduation Day embodies its title in more ways than one, tackling the word in a literal sense as well as its role in a hero’s journey, along with all the chaos and aspirations that this major crossroads can bring. Writer Josh Trujillo brings a lovely lighthearted and relatable tone to Jaime’s story, while artist Adrian Gutierrez, colorist Will Quintana, and letterer Lucas Gattoni bring it to life with eye-popping colors, vivid expressions, and electric action, all wrapped in a bow of genuine Latin culture and charm. If you’re looking for a series that brilliantly encapsulates the hero at its core, look no further than Blue Beetle: Graduation Day #1. — Matthew Aguilar
Rating: 5 out of 5
It’s no secret that I love a holiday anthology, but DC’s Grifter Got Run Over By A Reindeer #1 is a good anthology even if it’s holiday shenanigans. There are 8 stories told across 83 pages in this hefty issue and what makes this work is that despite the wide range of stories and creators, there is not only something for everyone—there’s funny, moving, weird, you name it—but it doesn’t overly rely on a general theme. This is an issue where you can genuinely pick and choose what you want to read, making it versatile, not just holiday-oriented. Some standouts are “Home for the Holidays” by Cavan Scott and Fico Ossio that sees Hawkman and Hawkwoman spending holidays on different worlds and has a massive emotional punch, there’s also the delightful “Eight Crazy Nights” that brings Hanukkah into things with Harley Quinn (brought to us by John Layman and Juan Doe) and it serves as a reminder that holidays can be fun and boy, we do need more Jewish and multi-faith representation in these sorts of things. Overall, each of the stories in this anthology is a winner and it’s a really great book overall. — Nicole Drum
Rating: 4 out of 5
Detective Comics 2022 Annual shows just how far Orgham line has manipulated Gotham, with the mysterious and dangerous family manipulating the city even in its earliest days. However, we also see how a time-traveling Bruce Wayne (calling back to Grant Morrison’s Batman run) may have laid his own seed for a resistance to come. This run really delves deep into some of the Barbatos mythos established by Morrison, and it’s interesting to see Ram V. draw such a direct line between the two runs. This is definitely the most interesting Detective Comics has been since the Morrison era and I’m looking forward to the comic’s continuation. –– Christian Hoffer
Rating: 5 out of 5
Justice Society of America #1 introduces readers to one story only to replace it with another at the end. Much of the issue is spent in Johns’ familiar expository manner with character voices used to slightly modulate an authorial tone explaining who Helena Wayne is and how she brought this incarnation of the JSA together. There’s little below that superficial explanation of timeline and character, as there’s no time spent characterizing the figures on the pages as though their outdated costumes alone should inspire awe; they do not. That isn’t to say that the pages are dull. Rather, Mikel Janin’s artwork is the only element of occasional interest, although Justice Society of America defaults to familiar costumes and forced splash pages that inspire no great effect. There’s simply too little life to a script that simply describes itself before revealing this uninspiring affair was merely prologue for a grander tale without a single good reason given to follow it. Justice Society of America #1 suggests this is a legacy best left alone. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 2 out of 5
At long last, Tom Taylor gives an origin story to the villain that’s been stalking Blüdhaven, ripping the hearts out of those most unsuspecting. It’s delightfully twisted, setting up the antithesis to Dick Grayson’s all-American persona. Heartless may be the worst thing to happen to Nightwing’s city, which says plenty. More importantly, however, is the short story here where Haley Grayson—yes, the dog Haley—imagines herself as DC’s next best superhero. — Adam Barnhardt
Rating: 4 out of 5
This special is just as exceptional as its titular protagonist, crafting two stories that embody so much of what makes DC’s comics so wonderful. Opening up the issue is a tale involving Nubia potentially joining the world’s greatest heroes – an inspired bout of storytelling that combines the plotting of a Gardner Fox-esque Silver Age adventure for the team, and some truly delightful character dynamics between Nubia and the other Leaguers. The issue concludes with yet another wonderful installment of Stephanie Williams and company’s recent storytelling for Nubia, which works as both a standalone adventure and a coda to those past two runs. — Jenna Anderson

Rating: 4.5 out of 5
While Superman has been back on the pages for Action Comics and Superman: Son of Kal-El for a little bit now, the anthology Superman: Kal-El Returns Special #1 brings the hero back in four stories that show how his return impacts and connects to the various people in his life. We get to see him back with Batman, his family, and more in stories that more or less fill some narrative gaps. In terms of cohesion, there isn’t a lot here, but as individual stories, these are pretty good. Mark Waid and Clayton Henry’s Batman/Superman story is a standout, as is Marv Wolfman’s – and truly, those two stories alone make this issue very worthwhile. But overall, it’s a nice reminder of who Superman is and that his stories are, at their heart, as much about the people around him as they are about Big Blue himself. — Nicole Drum
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
This anthology does well at celebrating the many heroes and villains that have been a part of the Wildstorm universe, with too many amazing writers and artists to count. Like any other comic book anthologies, there are some stories that shine a little more brightly than others. Regardless, this Anniversary Special does a great job in celebrating all things Wildstorm and feels like you’re shaking the hand of a familiar friend, so if you are looking to revisit some familiar characters and storylines such as the WildC.A.T.S, Authority, and more, this is the book for you. — Evan Valentine
Rating: 4 out of 5
The most cliche of superhero tropes weighs upon Avengers Assemble Alpha like gravity as two teams with excellent knowledge of the multiversal, Earth-killing threat that they face still fall into combat with one another over petty grievances and minor misunderstandings. Most of the pages in the issue are dedicated to the Avengers of 1,000,000 B.C. and their modern counterparts duking it out in a contest that hangs hats upon hats – multiple figures note that this is a cliche that should be avoided while the individual battles serve little more purpose than to note the obvious, like Starbrand being an ancient homage to the Hulk. Having followed this Avengers saga for nearly 100 issues, it’s borderline insulting to deliver such rote material with little care for the sprawling storyline that led to the crossover. Yet this first issue of December’s climactic trilogy gives little and adds less with even the subplot of Avenger Prime playing out as if it were lifted directly from an outline; and how underwhelming is it to see a flavorless white man in a suit as the ur-Avenger? Even Bryan Hitch’s typically wide panels stuffed with characters fail to impress as they often focus on unimpressive moments of action. Although he competently depicts this unnecessarily busy detour to a final battle, there are too few moments of note to not seek out better spectacle from Hitch and so the entire one-shot becomes an affair better summarized in the pages of The Avengers #63 next week. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 1.5 out of 5
If you were reading Rick Remender and John Romita Jr.’s run on Captain America back in 2012, then seeing the return of Ian Rogers/Nomad is a real treat. Sam Wilson moves from one sidekick to another, as he and Nomad infiltrate Mohannda together. The art takes a notable decline but still keeps the same tone from previous issues. A new wildcard by the name of Bathabile is introduced, who I’m assuming will be an important character in the “Pax Mohannda” story arc. — Tim Adams
Rating: 3 out of 5
Spider-Men: Double Trouble sees the team of writer Mark Tamaki and artists Gurihiru reunite for another delightful team-up book, this time pairing up Peter Parker with Miles Morales instead of the antagonistic Venom. The creative team once again bring a light-hearted comedic tone and the addition of writer Vita Ayala helps bring a new voice to Miles, who is now in the main character role. It doesn’t quite go the same route of Into The Spider-Verse or the PlayStation games, but instead plays off the dynamic of Peter not being particularly well-equipped as a mentor and mistaking Miles for a side-kick rather than a peer. The ending also promises for a boatload of Spidey’s rogues’ gallery to appear in the series, so there’s plenty of promise that this will be another fun series. — Connor Casey
Rating: 4 out of 5
Creating a sequel to what many consider to be a “comic book masterpiece” is no easy feat, but Pak, Garcia, and Bachs certainly seem able to do so in Worldbreaker, and I anticipate seeing where the series goes next. If you’re a fan of the original “Planet Hulk” story or are a Hulk fan in general, this is a must-buy as the creators have done something that many might believe is impossible in creating a worthy sequel to a timeless Marvel story. — Evan Valentine
Rating: 4.5 out of 5
With Sabé embarking on an assassination mission, her loyal ally Dormé aims to infiltrate the Galactic Empire to find out where she has been sent, hoping that Vader doesn’t discover the ruse. Sabé herself, on the other hand, confronts her target and must decide what course of action she’ll take. This book kicks off a new arc for the characters, so it serves largely as a catch-up for the events leading up to it and more of a stage-setting for what’s to come, with it looking like Sabé and the potential pull towards the Dark Side being a key theme of the upcoming issues. There’s not too much narrative progression, so we can’t say it’s an entirely thrilling book, but for something that essentially serves as a prologue, it piques our interest about what sort of allegiances Sabé will be making in the future and who she’ll ultimately align with. — Patrick Cavanaugh
Rating: 3 out of 5
Jed MacKay’s latest chapter into the world of Doctor Strange hits its boiling point with an issue that’s more flashback and retcon than anything. Regular artist Marcelo Ferreira is relegated to opening and closing pages with Stefano Landini taking on the bulk of the artistic duties, giving the bigger narrative a different feel than the rest of the series and not for the better. Landini is at their best in these pages when diving into the abstract power set of Strange and less the character exchanging dialogue. There’s still a uniqueness to be had here though so even if the art doesn’t live up to previous issues it’s a fun story to read. — Spencer Perry
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
Another Marvel civil war is brewing, pitting members of the publisher’s mystical stable against one another. As expected, Young continues to do a stellar job balancing this title’s massive ensemble, even adding a few new-ish characters to the mix this time around. Since there are so many characters involved, the overall narrative can grow thin but that’s perfectly all right for those hoping for a character-driven tale given this title has plenty of character to go around. — Adam Barnhardt
Rating: 4 out of 5
X-Terminators #3 sees Leah Williams pushing the grindhouse buttons perhaps too much, as some of the team’s raunchier dialogue seems somewhat contrived in places where it came naturally in the first two issues. Yet, it’s still delightful to see Professor X squirm awkwardly in the frame story as the team describes Dazzler’s ass and recalls the moment Tabitha Smith showed the crowd her explosive “boom booms.” X-Terminators is also escalating into a kitchen sink story, as now fae creatures from Otherworld, spaceships, and one of the Elders of the Universe are all involved, on top of the deadly fight club run by vampires established by the previous issues. Carlos Gomez brings a joyful energy to the blood-spattered visuals, making X-Terminators #3 another read unlike anything else in the X-Men’s catalog. — Jamie Lovett
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
The artwork by Marco Finnegan and Dearbhla Kelly really pops on each and every page, especially in the beginning of 007 #4 as James Bond pulls off one of his signature impersonations. Bond has gotten himself mixed up in a complicated web with huge international repercussions, and it appears MI6 is hot on his trail. — Tim Adams
Rating: 3 out of 5
This is by far the most clearly structured installment of 20th Century Men to date. It is built almost entirely around presenting The Suicide Cowboys attack in Afgahnistan using the simultaneous deployment of present images and excerpts from multiple historical sources to depict and contextualize the combat – there’s only a brief parallel flashback and a few denouement moments outside of this bulk. And it is a truly impressive accomplishment as the very nature of The Suicide Cowboys as a commentary on American military aggression is a potent thing; their varied depictions throughout the issue do this gonzo imagining justice. The simultaneous captions ensure this parade of impressively depicted ultraviolence does not escape meaning and pathos. Although it is primarily a battle between American and Soviet soldiers, the impact upon Afghan peoples is never lost as their voice is present throughout. This genuinely stunning commentary upon the madness of the American military machine would be a coup, but it is paired with some of the most significant steps forward in the series’ overarching narrative, too. 20th Century Men is quickly becoming one of the 21st century’s very best comic book series. –– Chase Magnett
Rating: 5 out of 5
After last issue’s reveal of a deadly monster, this issue focuses more on witnesses trying to cope with the horrors they’ve seen and strategizing with how to deal with the threat. Unfortunately for them, this looks to just be the beginning of their nightmares, as the creature is on the loose, someone in the airport might know more about the beast than they’re letting on, and the encroaching blizzard is thwarting any chance of escape. This installment continues to bring together tropes and formulaic elements seen in various other sci-fi stories like Alien, The Thing, and The Mist, but teases that there could be some exciting mythology reveals that might explain what’s really going on. At this point, it’s too early to say if the series will really break the mold in any fulfilling way, but even just by being a competent exploration of well-known storytelling elements makes it more engaging than other stories out there, we just hope the book cashes in on the good will its earned with these first two chapters. — Patrick Cavanaugh
Rating: 3 out of 5
Bob Phantom #1 is bringing superheroes back to the Archie Universe, and sadly, his debut issue falls flatter than a worn-out cape. Despite a promising start, the mismatched issue begins fraying at the edge just a few pages in. Its uneven dialogue and slow pacing are a slog despite Bob Phantom‘s wonderful color palette. And by the issue’s end, unfortunately, I felt very ready to say bye-bye to Bob Phantom. — Megan Peters
Rating: 2 out of 5
Briar expands its scope quite a bit here in issue #2. A number of new characters come into play and a fair amount of lore and backstory is dumped quickly. This makes Briar #2 a bit more cumbersome compared to the inaugural chapter, but this is to be expected to some degree given that this series is still in its early stages. I still like the core idea behind Briar and I’m looking forward to seeing how it continues to develop. — Logan Moore
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
I wasn’t expecting to learn Dora’s origin story so early in Damn Them All #2, but it helps to know her connection to Ellie’s deceased uncle. Dora and Ellie make a fine pair, even if their teamwork has a rocky beginning. The laws of magic in this world are clear enough to understand, and there is plenty of intrigue with spirits being let loose and the mad rush to contain them. — Tim Adams
Rating: 5 out of 5
The Dead Lucky #4 pushes its narrative forward at a much quicker pace—often shifting time and place on every other page—and it’s to the series’ net benefit. The issue makes clear much of the, until now, slowly-defined premise and clarifies that this is the story of an American insurgency. Drawing together multiple strands woven around the strangely powered suit of armor running through the streets of San Francisco, the final page all but informs the reader directly where this story is going. The quick pace is supported by constantly clear linework that never leaves identities or expressions in doubt, even if some of the electrical connections in combat sequences read as being unclear. The Dead Lucky #4 is the series’ most confident issue to date and with its purpose clearly defined suggests that the best is yet to come. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
Dead Mall feels pretty meandering so far. While I typically enjoy horror-centric stories like this, Dead Mall feels like it’s not really building to anything specific. It’s a comic that relies on its characters, and to this point, those characters are pretty uncompelling. I still think there’s a chance that my tune will change on Dead Mall, but it needs to sink its hooks into me quickly. — Logan Moore
Rating: 2.5 out of 5
Flawed #3 steps out this week with an action-packed chapter that flies by with little to say. As our characters dance around each other, new info comes to light about their pasts and benefactors. We can see where Flawed shines as its fight sequences breeze by page after page with little friction. But when it comes to moving the plot, well – this update will leave you wanting more. — Megan Peters
Rating: 2 out of 5
Killadelphia #25 is a truly outstanding issue and continues to deliver readers an incredible story on the page and plenty to consider after closing the comic book. The only slight misstep, if you can even call it that, is that the brief perspective of Sangster’s son probably isn’t necessary and serves to break the flow in what was otherwise an incredible beat for beat back and forth with the weight of, well, everything, in the balance. But even with that, this is truly an impressive master work of an issue that asks as many questions as it answers and begs the reader to examine themselves as much as the story on the page. — Nicole Drum
Rating: 4.5 out of 5
Mike Mignola and artist Ben Stenbeck reunite to continue the tale of Koshchei the Deathless while also providing a sequel to Hellboy in Hell. Though an attempt is made to give this title some leverage to potential new readers, this is a comic almost reserved for the hardcore Mignola/Hellboy fanatic. Fitting that descriptor however, it’s a nice start to a series that could very well become something very fresh and unique in this publishing line. Stenbeck’s work remains remarkable, managing to channel much of Mignola’s stylings of the underworld while also keeping the visuals consistent from the previous Koshchei storyline. — Spencer Perry
Rating: 4 out of 5
It’s not that this comic isn’t for me, although that’s certainly true; it’s that it’s unclear what aesthetic pleasure any reader might derive from these contents. There is barely any story to summarize – merely a pornographic premise crafted to unleash a torrent of gore. Yet there’s no substance being addressed in that parade of carnage and the artwork is of such banal qualities that it delivers neither shock nor titillation in its depictions. There’s something deeply pathetic about what is contained in Lovesick #2 and perhaps that’s some metatextual commentary on the men inside, but it’s frankly not worth parsing. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 1 out of 5
Seanan McGuire and Kath Lobo weave the story in Magic: Nahiri the Lithomancer around the major events of Nahiri’s life as established by the stories of the Magic: The Gathering sets in which she’s played a narrative role. The comic focuses on the many years that fill in the gaps between those stories, only alluding to the established milestones. This allows the comic to humanize and develop Nahiri into an interesting and fully formed character—with the soft visuals fitting the interior focus without being too far afield from the established look for Boom’s Magic universe—in ways that may not come across to those simply following Magic’s metaplot, though those without knowledge of that story may feel like they’re missing something. The two complement one another, and thus are best enjoyed together. At its root, Nahiri’s story is one of change, how scary it can be, and how grateful we all should be for it, and it makes for a surprisingly and welcomely intimate tale. — Jamie Lovett
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
The My Bad universe returns with My Bad II #1, and while it’s as zany as ever, it still manages to hook you into its core story, and I can’t help but want to see what happens next. Writers Mark Russell and Bryce Ingman inject a lighthearted tone throughout that takes the edge off of even the darkest of moments (see Pizza Man for your perfect example), and I found myself soon drawn into the world of Chandelier, Emperor King, and yes, Good Karen, who is exactly what you think. Artists Peter Krause and Joe Orsak, colorist Kelly Fitzpatrick, and letter Rob Steen deliver a classic feel to all three stories and highlight the eccentricities and personalities of each character and all without much of a punch being thrown. When things do result in some fireworks, it’s often not at all how you expect, and that’s part of what makes the book work. At times certain characters feel a bit too simplistic, but the over-the-top nature of it all and unpredictability helps overcome that, and there’s a lot of fun to be had here. — Matthew Aguilar
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
I’ve appreciated the plodding yet calculated manner in which Orcs: The Curse has arrived at this climax. Each issue has found a way to tell its own exciting stories while still building to a larger conflict, and the payoff here at issue #4 is quite satisfying. While Orcs doesn’t take itself too seriously, The Curse has found a way to continually weave together compelling character arcs in the midst of its numerous fart jokes. If you’re looking for a great ensemble series to read that features some stellar art, I really think that Orcs: The Curse is worth your time. — Logan Moore
Rating: 4 out of 5
I wasn’t quite sure what to expect from Plush #1, and the limited expectations I did have were blown away soon after issue #1 begins. Writer Doug Wagner, artist Daniel Hillyard, colorist Rico Renzi, and letterer Ed Dukeshire turn the book on its head about 10 pages in, and suddenly the pace quickens considerably and the book’s lead finds himself in a spiraling situation that can’t help hook the reader. Hillyard and Renzi also make sure that big twist is memorable and disturbing, and the bold colors and expressive characters are a perfect contrast to the creepier elements of the story. The first few pages of this story seem a bit stilted and in comparison to later parts of the book, but despite its slow start I am rather captivated and eager to see where this all goes. — Matthew Aguilar
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
None of my previous feelings on The Roadie have really changed here with issue #3. While this installment does a better job of fleshing out the main characters that are involved, I’m still finding myself pretty uninterested in the throughline story. I’m hard-pressed to now how my feelings could change on this front, but I’ll hope that something in the future changes my tone. — Logan Moore
Rating: 2.5 out of 5
The second arc of Rogue Sun begins here with another issue that helps set the status quo. Readers are quickly reminded of the teenager that leads the title, covering some of the exact same coming-of-age angles told earlier in the series. Redundancy aside, this comics universe continues to grow forward, introducing more larger-than-life villains that scratch the itch of those looking for darker lore in an otherwise light story. — Adam Barnhardt
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
If this new Star Trek series is going to be about someone, or something, killing the “gods” of the Star Trek universe, it only makes sense that it’d check in with the Klingons, who are said to have killed their gods for being “more trouble than they were worth,” early in the story. Star Trek #2 functions as a follow-up to Star Trek: Klingons #1, a one-shot by this series’ writers published by IDW earlier this year that told a tale of Kahless the Unforgettable. Those who haven’t read that issue may find this one somewhat hard to follow, and even those who have read the issue may want to revisit it as much is implied rather than explained here. The book continues to look great under Ramon Rosanas’ lines and Lee Loughridge’s colors, and Colin Kelly and Jackson Lanzing are handling the relationship—both those rekindled from Star Trek’s past and those crossing paths for the first time in this series—with equal aplomb. The series also continues to borrow a modern X-Men vibe, with a data page explaining how the Klingon Empire the threat of fascism from within, and it works to give the issue some heft. It’s a bit unwieldy compared to the debut issue, but still a stellar read. — Jamie Lovett
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
Starfleet really needs to do something about those holodecks. As if a sentient holographic Dracula isn’t enough, the added issue of, as the footnote asides call it, “programs programming programs” increases the threat exponentially in short order. And yet, there’s not much tension here as the crew simply acquiesces to Dracula’s demands and he behaves well, even heroically, in return. On one hand, it’s a funny extrapolation of Star Trek’s core tenants, especially those on display during the early days of Star Trek: The Next Generation under Gene Roddenberry. On the other, the chaotic B plot (or A plot? It’s hard to keep track with the way Lower Decks tends to invert things) isn’t tightly told enough to compliment the other plot appropriately. But this is the Star Trek: Lower Decks and the comic does a solid job of capturing the animated comedy’s voice and visuals. Fans won’t be disappointed. — Jamie Lovett
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
The Jedi Padawan Sav isn’t content with her life in the Jedi Academy, as she explores the locals when sneaking away under the cover of night, and what seems to merely be an exploration of the goings-on in Takodana results in an unlikely partnership with Maz Kanata, Dexter Jettster, and more unexpected allies. Given that the High Republic era is a point in time that not as many Star Wars fanatics are well-versed in (despite launching last year), there’s automatically a lot of potential for a series like this to explore entirely new worlds, characters, and dynamics. By painting Sav as someone uninterested in the Jedi ways, while most of the rest of Star Wars stories see the Jedi as famous myths, we get an entirely new perspective on the galaxy far, far away. Luckily, the inclusion of figures like Maz and Dexter, who appeared in other eras of the franchise, piques our interest in what their earlier exploits were like, so while this issue did little more than set the stage for an upcoming adventure, it marks a compelling blend of freshness and familiarity and we look forward to Sav’s upcoming exploits. — Patrick Cavanaugh
Rating: 4 out of 5
Stillwater #16 provides the town’s origin and it’s as satisfying of a lore as readers might have imagined. Previously assumed supernatural elements are given a specific form and tied into the history of the town and, by its nature, the United States itself. It’s a clear choice of era with archetypes that provide explanatory power for the series’ essential questions. All of this unfolds in a mix of narration and flashback sequences, which showcase Perez’s keen ability to transport readers with effective observation of details making captioned years functionally unnecessary. While Stillwater #16 provides readers with an aside to the series’ climactic arc, it also frames that story and the series as a whole splendidly. Two issues remain and they arrive with more promise than before in the wake of these revelations. — Chase Magnett
Rating: 4 out of 5
While the composition of Unbreakable Red Sonja still feels a little disjointed, the central core of it is just compelling enough to keep me invested. As the two Sonjas begin their reluctant adventure together, the violence of their pasts and futures come to a head in an entertaining way. Jim Zub, Giovanni Valletta, and company are crafting a Sonja tale that could ultimately stand out from the rest, if it carries the momentum of this issue. — Jenna Anderson
Rating: 4 out of 5
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