'Danger Street' #1 feels wholly original yet nostalgic too • AIPT – AIPT











‘Danger Street’ #1 kicks off an intriguing new maxiseries introducing a slew of well-written characters.
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Tom King and Jorge Fornés are back with a new maxiseries launching this week called Danger Street. Reimagining some of DC’s most obscure and offbeat superheroes from the original series DC 1st Issue Special originally published in the mid-1970s, the first issue is quintessential King as he probes superheroes in down-to-earth ways. Originally due out in May, was Danger Street #1 worth the wait?
Danger Street #1 is an interesting debut, to say the least. I wouldn’t say there was hype for this book beyond the creators attached since the characters used in the narrative are less well known. Metamorpho and Creeper have had memorable adventures, but they haven’t launched a series before. Pair these lesser-known characters with King’s writing style, and you have a comic that definitely requires a bit of patience on the reader’s part. That said, if you’ve read King and Fornés’ Rorschach or really enjoyed King’s other slow-burn narratives, you’ll be right as rain with Danger Street.

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Danger Street opens with an undisclosed man putting a bowling ball bag on a bar top. Inside the bag is Dr. Fate’s helmet, which begins speaking to the reader on the final panel. Smash cut to Lady Cop pulling over the local riffraff kids, the Dingbats, who are riding a four-wheeler on the main road. The story lingers on these characters in small moments, giving us a nuanced approach to dialogue and character writing. It’s taking its time to let the atmosphere and flow of the story wash over you.
The next subplot involves the Creeper, described by the Dr. Fate narrator as an Ogre. He’s incredibly violent and enjoys beating a petty criminal to a pulp. Soon we learn he’s up for a job opportunity as a newsman. The social commentary King is tackling is immediately apparent as he seeks to get his show as a pundit not dissimilar to a talking head on Fox News.
From there, we check in on Starman, Metamorpho, and Warlord, who are up to something described by the Dr. Fate helmet via captions as princes. They’re up to something and desire to become much more popular superheroes. Maybe even join the Justice League.

How the story begins.
Credit: DC Comics
As you progress through the comic, King and Fornés reveal the desires of these characters and eventually what sends them spiraling, or in the Creeper’s case, his wildest dream come true. The Dingbats and Lady Cop get the least attention, but a quick flashback for Lady Cop creates some trauma to explore further. It takes almost to the very last page, but once the hook of the series is established, you’ll be right there, highly anticipating the next issue.
While this story takes place in modern times–Lady Cop mentions she has a cellphone–it’s clear the 70s nostalgia of the original series is present. From Fornés art to the way King populates each page with dialogue and captions, this feels like a classic comic. Every angle on the action feels purposeful and well thought out. Nothing feels like filler or fluff with every word and piece of art, like some clue to dissect. It’s not a mystery in the conventional sense, but you can see how the characters and their actions are the more profound mystery to unravel.
If you’re looking for something that feels nostalgic and that will command your attention, give Danger Street #1 a shot. The creative team is up to something that feels wholly original yet emblematic of a different time in comics. It’s also a social commentary with ideas about superheroes in a world that feels quite real and lived in.

'Danger Street' #1 feels wholly original yet nostalgic too
‘Danger Street’ #1 feels wholly original yet nostalgic too
Danger Street #1

If you’re looking for something that feels nostalgic and that will command your attention, give Danger Street #1 a shot. The creative team is up to something that feels wholly original yet emblematic of a different time in comics. It’s also a social commentary with ideas about superheroes in a world that feels quite real and lived in.
Reader Rating0 Votes
0
Compelling subplots establishing each character well
The Creeper’s storyline has a social commentary that’ll be fun to explore
A slower pace that will require patience
9
Great
Buy Now
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